Cuisinart FP-12DC Elite Collection 12-Cup Food Processor, Die Cast

June 27, 2013 - Comment

Equipped with a 1000-watt peak-power motor, this convenient food processor quickly and easily slices, dices, chops, and purees, helping to reduce prep time in the kitchen. It supplies a 12-cup work bowl, plus a 4-cup work bowl that nests inside the bigger bowl–a versatile two-in-one design that can handle small and large batches alike. Both

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(as of January 18, 2018 8:41 pm UTC - Details)

Equipped with a 1000-watt peak-power motor, this convenient food processor quickly and easily slices, dices, chops, and purees, helping to reduce prep time in the kitchen. It supplies a 12-cup work bowl, plus a 4-cup work bowl that nests inside the bigger bowl–a versatile two-in-one design that can handle small and large batches alike. Both bowls feature durable polycarbonate construction, measurement marks up the side, and drip-free pour spouts. An exclusive SealTight Advantage System seals the bowls and locks the blades for clean, safe processing and pouring. In addition, the unit’s wide-mouth feed tube accommodates larger ingredients, which reduces the need for cutting food into smaller pieces first, and its electronic touchpad control panel offers three selections for on, off, and pulse. Use the machine to quickly blend up individual or family-size batches of pesto, chop onions and green peppers for a veggie pizza, or shred cheese for omelets on a Sunday morning. Accessories include a stainless-steel adjustable slicing disc (1 to 6 mm), a stainless-steel reversible shredding disc (fine/medium), a large and small stainless-steel chopping/mixing blade, and a dough blade. Thoughtfully designed, the food-prep appliance also provides blue LED indicator lights, a simple on/off locking system with push-button release, and dishwasher-safe removable parts for quick cleanup. A spatula, “how-to” DVD, and a recipe/instruction book come included. The food processor measures 7 by 10-1/2 by 15-1/5 inches and carries a three-year limited warranty with a 10-year warranty on the motor.

From the Manufacturer

Cuisinart extended the potential of every kitchen, with the introduction of the food processor in 1973. Now with the innovative Elite Collection, Cuisinart continues the pioneering tradition. Loaded with 1000 watts of peak power and innovative options, this ground breaking collection utilizes the exclusive SealTight Advantage system and a revolutionary nested bowl design to usher in the next generation of food processing. With two nested bowls, a reversible shredding disc and adjustable slicing disc (8 different options with 2 discs), a dough blade, and a versatile chopping/mixing blade, there is no limit to what you can do. The SealTight lid and blade assembly lets you utilize the maximum of each bowl’s processing capacity without spills or leaks, and ensures easy cleaning and convenient handling. The motor housing base is extra-durable with a streamline design that provides a solid foundation for the demands of food processing. It’s versatile, powerful, and user-friendly food processor–something consumers always expect from Cuisinart.

Product Features

  • 1000-watt food processor with 12-cup work bowl and nesting 4-cup work bowl
  • On/off/pulse touchpad controls; wide-mouth feed tube; blade-locking system
  • Stainless-steel slicing disc, shredding disc, chopping/mixing blades, and dough blade
  • Dishwasher-safe parts; spatula, “how-to” DVD, and recipe/instruction book included
  • Measures 7 by 10-1/2 by 15-1/5 inches; 3-year limited warranty; 10-year motor warranty

Comments

Enthous says:

I like it a lot, but not in love. Let me begin by telling you this processor replaces a 30-year-old original Cuisinart DLC-8. It didn’t have a wide feed tube, and had much less power, so I’m not making a comparison with a newer, comparable machine. It’s kind of like comparing an economy car to a Mercedes. Also, I got it for a significant discount during a Macy’s sale, which is the only reason I bought it. I don’t know if I’d pay the regular price for it. Another reviewer liked the limited edition better when spending the big bucks. That said, I’m happy with it, but not as thrilled as I expected to be.First of all, be forewarned, this baby is BIG. I have a small appliance garage on my counter. My old one fit in there facing front-to-back, with the work bowl attached and the cover inverted. This one is so large I can’t face it forward — the door won’t close. So it’s in sideways, with the bowls attached, but the cover sits on its side next to it, because with the large feed tube you can’t just turn…

Chandler says:

The food processor SHOW DOWN: A comparison of 14 cup stainless Cuisinart food processors Update: cuisinart no longer carries the Limited Edition. However, it periodically gets reintroduced by them. I’ve been asked to leave my review up based upon it covering the other two and noting things one might consider in comparisons. However this old model of the LE is hard to find now so I wanted to note that up front.When I buy a new kitchen or household item with lots of competitors I do loads of comparison/contrasting and research first if it’s over a hundred bucks…Knowing it was time for a new food processor, I began comparing models. However, I found it a tad difficult to do with all the different blades, codes, etc.Therefore, once I had completed my own shopping and comparisons, I thought it might be helpful for anyone else in the same situation if I posted my own comparisons here.I’ll start by saying, after all the testing I decided to order the CUISINART LIMITED EDITION Metal (NOT THE ELITE) 14 cup food processor on Amazon. I found it…

William T. Wroblicka says:

Not an improvement… I’ve owned various models of Cuisinarts for many years and have always considered them the Cadillac of food processors. Recently I gave away my DLC-2014 model to a relative and upgraded to the FP-14DC, their newest model. I’m beginning to think I may have been too hasty. The most obvious difference between the newer and older model is the design of the workbowl. Cuisinarts have always had straight-sided bowls, but the FP-14DC’s bowl is flared — wider at the top than at the bottom. Presumably the company’s engineers determined that the newer design performs better — or at least as well — as the older design, but that hasn’t been my experience. One problem is that food seems to collect in the seam between the side and bottom of the bowl much more readily than in older models. I used it the other day to chop about two cups of walnuts. When I dumped the chopped nuts out of the bowl, I saw that two or three tablespoons of walnut powder had collected and jammed in the seam. I had to use…

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